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CASE REPORT
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 52-55

Biological Restoration: A Natural Replacement for a Fractured Tooth


1 Intern, Sinhgad Dental College and Hospital, Pune, Maharashtra, India
2 Reader, Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Sinhgad Dental College and Hospital, Pune, Maharashtra, India
3 Postgraduate Student, Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Sinhgad Dental College and Hospital, Pune, Maharashtra, India
4 Lecturer, Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Sinhgad Dental College and Hospital, Pune, Maharashtra, India
5 Head of Department, Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Sinhgad Dental College and Hospital, Pune, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Vivek Sunil Nair
Intern, Sinhgad Dental College and Hospital, 44/1, Vadgaon Budruk, Pune, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2277-4696.167572

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Fractured anterior teeth due to traumatic injuries are a common occurrence in dental practice. The role of operative dentistry in such cases is to restore proper tooth form, function, and esthetics. Achieving this by bonding sterile dental fragments to teeth with large coronal destruction is expressed as "biological restoration." This approach provides excellent esthetics as compared to composites or cast restorations, especially in terms of translucency and is also a cost-effective alternative to the same. This paper reports the case of a 22-year-old male in whom biological restoration was considered as a biofunctional and esthetic replacement of the fractured central incisor (Ellis Class III tooth fracture) with more than 40% loss of tooth material. Following clinical and radiographic evaluation, endodontic treatment of the fractured tooth was carried out. Post space was prepared to receive the biological restoration. Extracted teeth were then used to fabricate a biological post and biological crown; which was then sterilized in accordance with biosecurity standards and later cemented. According to the available literature and clinical evidence, biological restorations can be considered as an efficient option for management of fractured anterior teeth.


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