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CASE REPORT
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 46-49

Management of traumatically intruded permanent maxillary lateral incisor - Case report and review of literature


1 Department of Periodontology, HP Government Dental College and Hospital, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India
2 Department of Public Health Dentistry, HP Government Dental College and Hospital, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India
3 Department of Periodontology, Dental Faculty, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Deepak Sharma
Department of Periodontology, Government Dental College and Hospital, Shimla - 171 001, Himachal Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2277-4696.185193

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Primary etiologic factors of trauma in the permanent dentition are bicycle accidents, sports accidents, falls, and fights. From the standpoint of therapy, anatomy, and prognosis, five different types of luxation lesions are recognized: Concussion, subluxation, extrusive luxation, lateral luxation, and intrusive luxation. Intrusive luxation is apical displacement of tooth into the alveolar bone. The tooth is driven into the socket, compressing the periodontal ligament, and commonly causes a crushing fracture of the alveolar socket. It is considered one of the most severe luxation injuries to affect permanent teeth. Intrusion injuries are often associated with severe damage to the tooth, periodontium, and pulpal tissue. The rare occurrence of this injury, 0.3–1.9% in the permanent dentition, has resulted in limited studies to support suggested treatment regimens. Clinical treatment for intrusion is especially difficult because of the severe complications accompanying it. These complications include pulp necrosis or obliteration, inflammatory root resorption, ankylosis, replacement root resorption, and loss of marginal bone support. Hence, the aim of presenting this case report of intrusive luxation is to highlight the importance of prompt care and root canal dressing and discuss the several treatments proposed to reposition the intruded teeth.


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